Who Do I Work With?

  • You are an artist at any stage of your game—established, mid-career, emerging, or just out of school—and you feel stuck. The kind of stuck where your legs are filled with lead. Or you feel suffocated, perhaps paralyzed.
  • You are lucky enough to have gallery representation that is doing well with your work. But your creative juices are flowing in a new direction. You are excited, but your gallery isn’t and keeps demanding more of your earlier, “sure bet” work — what do you do?
  • You are out of art school. Everyone around you loves your work and encourages you to get out and show it. Should you? If yes, where do you start? Where will you show? And what if no one takes you on? What kind of relationship/arrangements can you forge with galleries. How do you go about it? Are they offering you an honest deal? Do you feel out of your league?
  • You are an artist who has worked hard and long, but the doors of the art world just don’t open for you. You think about quitting, but that creative fire keeps right on burning. How do you go on? What do you do?
  • You are a mid-career artist. Your work is ripe and mature. You’ve already gotten some recognition, but your career seems to stall. How do you break through to the next level?
  • You are a successful artist, plenty of shows, media coverage, good reviews. You’ve arrived. And yet, you feel stuck. What is really going on? Where are you stuck, exactly… and what do you do about it?
  • You are an artist “on the side,” but you have a burning desire for your art to be at the center of your world. How do you go about it? Where do you begin?
  • You find yourself angry at a world that doesn’t give you the recognition you think you deserve. Your art is really good, yet no one seems to care. You’re beset by a sense of hopelessness. What can you do?

I read every submission, and I promise that you will hear from me as soon as possible.

Yours,
Yoram Gil

P.S. From my coaching files:
His ability to draw on his own experience enables him to better understand the loneliness of the artist during the creative process. This adds credible and authentic dimension to his remarks and advice. —Nona Orbach